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Food Shoppers Quiz Part 2

On November 17, 1966, more than 70 educational television stations presented a one-hour special, the National Food Buyers Quiz. The program was produced by WETA-TV, Washington, D. C., with the assistance of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Consumer and Marketing Service.

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1. To insure the wholesomeness of federally inspected meat and poultry, U.S. Department of Agriculture inspectors examine every animal and bird processed in federally inspected plants. True or false?

Correct! Wrong!

True. Federal meat and poultry inspectors examine every animal and bird during and after slaughter to insure that only wholesome meat is sold for human food. In addition, these inspectors from USDA’s Consumer and Marketing Service inspect everything connected with the plant’s sanitation and its processing equipment to make sure that nothing will hurt the wholesomeness of the meat or poultry.

2. All canned hams can be eaten without further cooking. True or false?

Correct! Wrong!

True, they are all fully cooked, and can be eaten just as they come from the can.

3. All hams not in a can must be cooked before serving. True or false?

Correct! Wrong!

False. Hams labeled “Fully Cooked” do not need to be cooked before serving regardless of whether or not they come from a can.

4. All canned hams can be stored at room temperature. True or false?

Correct! Wrong!

False. While all canned hams are fully cooked, not all of them are fully processed to the point that they can be stored at room temperature. Canned hams subject to Federal meat inspection that require refrigeration must be labeled “Perishable— Keep Under Refrigeration,” and must be refrigerated during storage and distribution, and in the home.

5. You cannot use the gelatin mixture found in canned hams. True or false?

Correct! Wrong!

False. The gelatin mixture is ideal for using in a glaze, in ham gravy, or for basting the ham. It is tasty and nutritious since it contains ham juices, meat proteins, and some fat.

6. If you want a real tender piece of beef, you can forget about everything but the grade. True or false?

Correct! Wrong!

False. You should pay attention to the cut, as well as the grade. Of course the top grades — which are USDA Choice and USDA Prime — are more tender than the lower grades, for any one cut of meat. But some cuts are also much more tender than others. You can depend on USDA Choice and Prime rib roasts, rib steaks, and loin steaks to be consistently tender, juicy, and flavorful. But even in the top two grades, the less tender cuts must be pot-roasted, braised, or stewed. These include the flank, brisket, shank, and arm roast.

7. Turkeys are a good buy —

Correct! Wrong!

C — All year around. Retail stores traditionally offer special bargains on turkey at Thanksgiving. But turkey is no longer just a seasonal food — it is now easy to get and a good buy at any time of the year. And turkey is now available in many different forms, including turkey roasts.

8. To get the most turkey for your money , you should buy a U.S. Grade A turkey weighing —

Correct! Wrong!

As C — 18 pounds or more. Not only does the largest turkey have more meat in proportion to bone than the smaller ones, but the larger ones also usually are sold for a few cents less per pound. Look for the U.S. Grade A shield mark on the package. Grades are based on the meatiness of the bird and its appearance or freedom from defects — and Grade A is the top quality for turkeys.

9. Suppose you want to buy a chicken , but haven t made up your mind how you want to cook it. Which of these could you cook in the the greatest variety of ways — or is there any difference?

Correct! Wrong!

A — If you get a frying chicken you can fry, broil, barbecue, roast or even stew it. A stewing chicken is an older bird and should be cooked with moist heat — stewed or steamed — to make it tender. All poultry that is inspected by the US DA must have either the class name (fryer, roaster, etc.) or the term “young” or “mature” on the label. If it’s labeled “fryer” or “broiler” you know it’s a young bird, 8 to 12 weeks old, and tender. If it’s labeled “stewing chicken” or “hen” or “fowl” it is an older bird and will not be as tender.

10. The weight of a dozen “Large” eggs must be at least —

Correct! Wrong!

B — 24 ounces. The other weights are those for the other official U.S. weight classes. There is a difference of 3 ounces per dozen eggs between each weight class and the one next to it. Extra Large (27 ounces), Large (24 ounces), Medium (21 ounces), and Small (18 ounces) are the sizes generally found in stores. Two other sizes —Jumbo (30 ounces) and Peewee (15 ounces) — are sometimes available.

11. Assume you are going to buy some U.S. Grade A eggs. To get the most egg for your money , which is the better bargain —

Correct! Wrong!

C is the right answer to this arithmetic problem. The difference here is 9 cents a dozen and both the Medium eggs and the Large eggs cost exactly 3 cents an ounce. (Divide the number of ounces into the price per dozen to find out the cost per ounce.) At this price level, if the difference were more than 9 cents a dozen between neighboring weight classes, the smaller eggs would be the bargain. If the price spread were less than 9 cents a dozen, the larger eggs would be cheaper, per ounce. Of course, your actual choice may depend on many things, but in comparing prices of different weights, be sure you compare eggs of the same quality Grade.

Food Shoppers Quiz Part 2
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